The New Mexico Center for School Leadership and its Leadership High School Network are demonstrating through local evidence that another way of teaching and learning is possible.

Mission:

The mission of the New Mexico Center for School Leadership (the Center) is to develop high schools and educational leaders with input from the people who have the most at stake in the success of our educational system: students and families, community members and employers.

Vision:

The vision of the New Mexico Center for School Leadership is to create and sustain a healthy, vibrant and responsive network of schools that is a catalyst for education policy reform locally and nationally.

Why:

New Mexico is one region where high school completion and transition into college and careers is an especially difficult path; 68.7% of young people graduated from high school in 2013 and 59% of 20-24 year-olds were employed in 2012.

A 2006 study commissioned by the Gates Foundation found:

  • 47% of dropouts say the major reason for dropping out was that classes weren’t interesting
  • 69% said they weren’t motivated or inspired to work hard in school
  • 81% said there should be more real-world and experiential learning in schools

 

Personalized Learning in Action

In New Mexico, we are propelling evidence of innovative teaching and learning that will impact entire communities and drive education policy in new and inevitable directions. We are at the beginning of a change in thinking about schools; the community is searching for answers to some of our most vexing problems. The Center is dedicated to exploring how we can re-imagine our schools to adapt to and meet the dynamic needs of our community. We are invested in developing new mental models for schools and new ways to judge their effectiveness to meet the challenges of the future.

Watch the video series below to view some of the innovative schools in our network in action:

 

What we do:

We are at the beginning of a change in thinking about schools; the community is searching for answers to some of our most vexing problems. Faced with challenges such as slow economic growth, high unemployment, and taxing realities for our communities’ health, the New Mexico Center for School Leadership is dedicated to exploring how schools can be re-imagined to adapt to and meet the dynamic needs of our communities.

Tony Monfletto approaches school design through a community development lens. The school is considered an intermediary between young people and employers, weaving together economic development and youth development. The ACE model starts with an exploration of the conditions of the industry, identifying issues that are important to the industry, such as efficiency in health care or biomimicry in architecture. This isn’t an occupational focus—it’s integrating the dynamics of industry with the academic curriculum. For students with little access to knowledge about a variety of industries, creating these linkages between academic standards and real-world challenges in industry embeds career development and motivation deeply into the school culture and curriculum. The creative process is to blend real-world projects and standards so that students become experts in the disciplines.

-Chris Sturgis, The Art and Science of Designing Competencies